El Blog

Tenemos muchas deberes, pero qué necesitamos es una dirección dónde nuestra vida es afinado en la voz dentro de nosotros.

laboratoryequipment:

Oldest-Running Titrators Celebrated at PittconMetrohm is a pioneer in ion analysis, and is lauded for bringing the very first “titrator” to market in 1956. Coinciding with the introduction of Metrohm’s newest Ti-Touch super-compact titrators — which made their official debut at Pittcon — Metrohm USA launched a contest to find their oldest titrator still in operation today in North America.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Oldest-Running-Titrators-Celebrated-at-Pittcon-031612.aspx

laboratoryequipment:

Oldest-Running Titrators Celebrated at Pittcon

Metrohm is a pioneer in ion analysis, and is lauded for bringing the very first “titrator” to market in 1956. Coinciding with the introduction of Metrohm’s newest Ti-Touch super-compact titrators — which made their official debut at Pittcon — Metrohm USA launched a contest to find their oldest titrator still in operation today in North America.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Oldest-Running-Titrators-Celebrated-at-Pittcon-031612.aspx

i-failed-hullabaloo:

tennant-tumblr:

gallifreyfieldsforever:

General Relativity in 8 gifs

Need to see this movie again!

See, if David Tennant taught me everything, It’d all be so much easier to learn.

(via likeaphysicist)

life:

When Albert Einstein died on April 18, 1955, his funeral and cremation were intensely private affairs, and only one photographer managed to capture the events of that extraordinary day: LIFE magazine’s Ralph Morse.

“I grabbed my cameras and drove the 90 miles to Princeton from my home in northern New Jersey. Einstein died at the Princeton Hospital, so I headed there first. But it was chaos — so many journalists, photographers, onlookers milling around outside what, back then, was a really small hospital. ‘Forget this,’ I said, and headed over to the building where Einstein’s office was.”

Above: Ralph Morse’s photograph of Einstein’s office in Princeton, taken hours after Einstein’s death and captured exactly as the Nobel Prize-winner left it.
(see more — LIFE at 75: LIFE Photographers Look Back)

life:

When Albert Einstein died on April 18, 1955, his funeral and cremation were intensely private affairs, and only one photographer managed to capture the events of that extraordinary day: LIFE magazine’s Ralph Morse.

“I grabbed my cameras and drove the 90 miles to Princeton from my home in northern New Jersey. Einstein died at the Princeton Hospital, so I headed there first. But it was chaos — so many journalists, photographers, onlookers milling around outside what, back then, was a really small hospital. ‘Forget this,’ I said, and headed over to the building where Einstein’s office was.”

Above: Ralph Morse’s photograph of Einstein’s office in Princeton, taken hours after Einstein’s death and captured exactly as the Nobel Prize-winner left it.

(see more LIFE at 75: LIFE Photographers Look Back)

(via likeaphysicist)

theseablog:

Things that’ll keep you up at night, part 1:

This is Cymothoa exigua. That is, the thing thats inside the fish mouth is Cymothoa exigua. Otherwise known as the Toungue Eating parasite, it does exactly what you’d expect it to do: It enters through the gills of the fish, removes its tongue by cutting off blood flow to it, and attaches it self where the tongue would have normally sat. 

While this is all rather horrible and nasty, C. exigua doesn’t actually do any major harm to host fish and fish are able to use the parasite as they would use a tongue. 

Don’t worry though, it doesn’t affect humans.

(Source: seascienceweekly, via laboratoryequipment)